Monday, January 17, 2011

The Mithraeum at Marino














Mithras and the bull, fresco from Temple of Mithras, Marino, Italy, dated 2-nd AD.

1. The sanctuary's bottom with the bull's killing picture and an altar at the center which makes know the dedicator's name, Crescens, manager of M. Alfius Severus.

2. Mithras killing the bull.

3. The dog and the snake rush upon the wound to avoid that the blood goes down.

4. God Sun from whom some rays depart, striking the god Mithras.

5. The giant struck by Jupiter.

6. Personification of the Moon.

7. Oceanus lying down.

8. Mithras' birth from the rock

9. Mithras taming the bull.

10. Mithras carries the bull in the cavern.

11. Pact of alliance between Mithras and the Sun.

12. Kneeled Sun struck by the god Mithras.

13. Mithras throws the arrow on a rock from which the water gushes.

Photos by Carlo Pavia.

7 comments:

Janas said...

Scans source: Carlo Pavia - Roma Mitraica - Carlo Lorenzini Editiore, 1986.

bolingo69 said...

So absolutely beautiful! Wonderful colours and wonderful time working also as an artist....

Janas said...

Very well said, Bolingo. The mildews of time that blend the colors, amplify the mistery of the mythical events.

Roger Pearse said...

A marvellous set of images -- and thank you for the explanation at the bottom.

Can I ask where the images come from? You did not take them yourself, did you?

Janas said...

Hello Roger! Welcome to my blog and thanks for leaving a comment. I have scanned the images from the book by Charles Pavia mentioned above.

Greetings,
Janas.

Roger Pearse said...

Thank you! And I had not realised that you can click through on the pictures to even larger images!

I doubt that anyone in the English-speaking world has ever read the Pavia book. But it is plainly very interesting. Are there more images in it, other than the Marino Mithraeum?

Janas said...

Hi Roger, yes, in the book there are other images of mithraeums like S.Maria Capua Vetere, Vulci, Sutri, the mithraeum of Seven Spheres etc...

"Roma Mitraica" was published in bilingual edition (Italian and English).

Best,
Janas.